In the second part of this tutorial, we color correct a shot taken with a daylight balanced LED light. The image is already looking pretty good straight out of the camera, and the differences might be too subtle to see given that the images uploaded to WordPress are small and much darker than the originals. For that reason, I’ve added a short clip at the end of this post.

2. SOOC with waveform.
2. SOOC with waveform.
3. Corrected Exposure.
3. Corrected Exposure.
4. After dropping the Draw a Mask effect on the clip, isolating the chart and examining the RGB parade, we see that highlights, midtones and shadows line up and there is a dot in the middle of the vectorscope, indicating good white balance.
4. After dropping the Draw Mask effect on the clip, isolating the chart and examining the RGB parade, we see that highlights, midtones and shadows line up and there is a dot in the middle of the vectorscope, indicating good white balance.
5. Having reset the mask, drawing a rectangle around the color squares of the Colorchecker, bossting saturation and looking at the vectorscope, we see there is a color shift.
5. Having reset the mask, we draw a rectangle around the color squares of the Colorchecker, and boost saturation. Looking at the vectorscope, we see there is a color shift.
6. Let's open the color tab and select hue_saturation curves. We then click on the yellow, red, green, magenta, blue, and cyan color chips on the chart.
6. Let’s open the color tab and select hue/saturation curves. We then click on the yellow, red, green, magenta, blue, and cyan color chips on the chart.
7. Holding down on the Shift key, we drag each of the hues up and down until all six colors are lined up on the veectorscope.
7. Holding down on the Shift key, we drag each of the hues up and down until all six colors are lined up on the vectorscope.
8. After unselecting the mask and removing added saturation.
8. After unselecting the mask and removing added saturation.
9. Lastly, because the face looks a tad red, we go back and, using the hue_saturation curves, reduce the red a touch. The difference is subtle, but the clip where we corrected exposure only is a bit yelllower.
9. Lastly, because the face looks a tad red, we go back and, using the hue/saturation curves, reduce the red channel a touch. That was easy!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.